witchcraft

Showing all 7 results

  • Rise of the Witch by Jason Kondrath

    0 out of 5

    Jeanie long suffered her parents mental, physical, emotional, and sexual abuse so she summoned the “Powers of Darkness” to help her, and they did -for a price. They not only gave her solace, but vengeance, and no one was spared.
    In the aftermath Jeanie met and fell in love with Mark, a man she loved more than life itself. And soon she found herself pregnant. The young couple planned to marry, but Jeanie never told her fiancee about her past debts…

  • The Shadow, the Siren, and the Sage (Part Three of the Witch Doctor Trilogy) by Wayne Kyle Spitzer

    0 out of 5

    A series of enormous explosions rocked the grounds and Jeremiah hit the deck, pieces of glass and other debris raining down upon him, pattering his shoulders. Thump! Ka-thump! Thump!

    Now it is too late to turn back, he thought to himself, and wondered if Satyena, wherever she was, were laboring under the same yoke: the yoke of wanting to destroy a thing while at the same time yearning (paradoxically) for its embrace. Then he was up and running, running for the base of the cliff, wanting to look back and yet too terrified to do so, a Bible quote from one of Kill-sin’s sermons echoing in his ear: But Lot’s wife looked back, and she became a pillar of salt.

  • The Dagger and the Chalise | Part Two of The Witch Doctor Trilogy by Wayne Kyle Spitzer

    0 out of 5

    He went into the kitchen and poured her a glass of water. “How long has it been since you’ve eaten?”

    “I’m not hungry,” she said. She seated herself slowly, tentatively. “Two, maybe three days. Ever since Sister Samain wrested control of the coven from the Council. Thank you …” She took the glass from Jeremiah, still looking at the paintings. “They’re all done by the same hand, aren’t they?”

    He took off his wide-brimmed hat and studied them. “The same eye. Sometimes Jasper’s hand shakes uncontrollably and I have to steady it with my own. Other times I am his hand, and he tells me what to do.” He laughed a little. “He says that I am an artist, just as he. But even I know it’s the eye that sees, not the hands.”

    She continued staring at them. “No, I don’t think that’s true. These pictures have lines of grace … look, see how the fingers are elongated, and tend to curve up or down depending on the position of the body. They dance upon the canvas … surely you can see that. I think you paint them together, Jeremiah.”

    He swung the strap of the respirator over his head and set it on a mantle. “I’m just his hands.” He moved to leave the room again.

    “Just? But hands are for feeling,” she said.

    He paused at the entrance to the hall. “And they’re for killing, too.” Then he disappeared into the dark.

    And she thought, It’s the heart that kills, Jeremiah. The hard one by slaying others … and the soft by slaying itself. Then she pushed it from her mind.

  • Enter the Witch Doctor by Wayne Kyle Spitzer

    0 out of 5

    They were the kind of musical notes men and woman once swayed to—even worshiped to—or so Jasper had told him, ground from an instrument called an “organ”—which had once been common, or so he’d said, but had vanished from the face of the world. So, too, were there cymbals, which echoed throughout the crew compartment of the War Wagon like tinsel—if tinsel could be said to have a sound—and mingled with the steely whispers of their muskets and tanks and other gear as the truck rocked and their harnesses held them fast.

    “When a maaan loves a woman,” sang a hearty and soulful voice both inside and outside the compartment, and Jeremiah knew they were close, else the driver wouldn’t have cued the music, and when he scanned the other Witch Doctors, strapped in six to a bench in the wagon’s cramped confines, he knew that they knew it too. What was more, he knew that, however fearsome they looked in their black jumpsuits and white flame-retardant vests, their goggled respirators, their buckled hats—they were frightened, too.

  • Testament: The Trial by Edward V’Kanty

    0 out of 5

    For the first time anywhere, Testament draws the reader into the New Yorke witch trials! Experience this 17th century horror firsthand and decide for yourself whether or not to condemn the accused for heresy and witchcraft.

    Testament: The Trial It is a matter of public record (and public knowledge) that, in the year 1692, the infamous witch trials swept through the colony of Salem, Massachusetts. While precious little may be known about the witch trials of Salem and those witches that the good puritans of Salem persecuted, there is even less known about the witch trials that swept through the remainder of the Thirteen Colonies. For instance, in 1665, twenty-seven years before the Salem witch trials, the people of New Yorke believed themselves to be plagued by the devil’s works and so the New Yorke Court of Assizes was established to deal with this spiritual epidemic. The New Yorke witch trials began with a very unusual case of witchcraft and heresy: that of Ralph and Mary Hall.

    The following fictionalized book is based upon the trial of Ralph and Mary Hall, accused of practicing witchcraft and sorcery against the family of Ann Rogers. This book takes a look at what may have happened and how New Yorke, like Salem, could have fallen prey to the fear of witchcraft.

    There is but one catch: You, the reader must determine the path this colony is to follow. There can be no greater responsibility than to be called upon to serve as a juror in these witch trials. After reading the journal entries of apprentice magistrate Singent Straubb and the court documents regarding the trial of accused witches Ralph Hall and his wife Mary, how will you cast your verdict?

    Testament Verdict: Guilty You have chosen to convict the Halls and condemn them to death as witches. Now read the remaining entries in the journal of Singent Straubb to learn what fate your verdict has had upon the entire colony of New Yorke…

    Testament Verdict: Not Guilty You have chosen not to convict the Halls and they shall be released forthwith. Only the journal of Singent Straubb may tell what fate your verdict will have upon the entire colony of New Yorke…

  • Till Death and Beyond by Angie Skelhorn

    0 out of 5

    Till Death and Beyond opens with a teenage girl named Zoe, inexperienced in witchcraft, in the woods on a Full Moon cast a spell for a love she feels is lost to her. The teenager new to magic, is careless of her words for her desire. The spirit of a maiden witch appears. At first the teenager is afraid of the ghostly figure, and then her curiosity calms her nerves.

    The Spirit tells the tale how she and the love of her life were separated by ignorance. Zoe, the teenage girl experiments with magic to reunite the Spirit with her long lost love.