Seven for a Secret by Rumer Haven


Book Description
It’s the year 2000, and twenty-four-year-old Kate moves into a new apartment to find a new state of independence in a new millennium. Almost immediately, she starts crushing on a hot guy who lives in her building. Deciding to take a break from her boyfriend Dexter, Kate believes the only thing now separating her from the fresh object of her sexual fantasies is the thin wall between their neighboring apartments.

A former 1920s hotel, Camden Court has housed many lonely lives over the decades—and is where a number of them have come to die. They’re not all resting in peace, however, including ninety-year-old Olive, who dropped dead in Kate’s apartment and continues to make her presence known.

For Olive has a secret she’s dying to tell. One linking her to the sex, scandal, and sacrifice of a young dreamer named Lon. As the past haunts the present, Kate’s romantic notion that the thrill-of-the-chase beats the reality-after-the-catch unexpectedly entwines her modern-day love life with Lon’s Jazz Age tragedy.

With a little supernatural and a lotta’ razzle-dazzle, Seven for a Secret is where historical fiction meets contemporary rom-com—from the Roaring Twenties when the “New Woman” was born, to the modern Noughties when she really came of age.

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SWEPT AWAY by Henry L. Sullivan III

SWEPT_AWAY_COVER1Fresh off a break up, Sheila McKinley, the easygoing college professor, meets Jasira Said, the up and coming journalist and political columnist.

Sheila has no idea her friend Rima is acquainted with Jasira, so their arranged meeting is easily disguised as a simple dinner party. But this simple dinner party turns into a night full of surprises. Even after she agrees to show Jasira around town, Sheila really doesn’t suspect her real intentions. But after an accident at a night club things move quickly, until in the end everything is crystal clear.

This is the first episode of the serial THE AMERICAN FATHERS.

Targeted Audience: 21 and older

Author Bio:
The best description of my writing is Near Future Fiction. I love technology, and I also believe social issues can be addressed in fiction, without compromising the strength of the story or lowering the entertainment level of the work.

In his Listmania! List, Carlos Baez says Near Future Fiction writers “usually extrapolate imaginatively from present trends.” Since we are narrating stories that take place sometime in the next one hundred years, they may include strange, intriguing, and even frightening technologies and phenomena, but our worlds are familiar in a way that makes the events in the stories feel immediate, and therefore avoidable.

Although current social trends may include Monsanto and others lobbying congress for the ability to obtain patents on human genetic sequences, it is still possible for us to avoid the world of The Windup Girl, in which ‘calorie companies’ devastate the global population through plagues caused by genetically enhanced, treatment resistant, disease causing organisms.

In some ways, Dystoopian Narratives are great metaphorical expressions of our fears. Stories like The Hunger Games and Divergent open to worlds that are economically, socially, and politically screwed up. There is also typically the presumption that it’s been that way for a long time.

For the characters, the time before global catastrophe is a distant memory. This creates chronological distance between our world and that of the book’s heroin, making it easier for readers to live vicariously through these engaging characters, as they stand up to fascist societies and battle despotic leaders.

Like Fantasy, Dystopian Science Fiction transports the reader into a completely different world. One which is often far simpler than our own, in which seven percent unemployment characterizes the same economy that also supports a booming stock market, and selfies and twerking have been placed upon media shelves alongside Duck Dynasty and a Whites only Santa Clause.

I acknowledge that our world is confusing, but to me it’s also incredibly interesting. Interesting in a way that can be entertaining, and enlightening. This is evident in well written shows like Homeland and House of Cards.

Characters like Carrie Mathison and Francis Underwood inspire me to write The Hacker, Bryce Anderson, Vanessa Stanton, and crazy Rafi. I hope you enjoy them and learn as much as I have in creating them.

Henry L. Sullivan III

Website(s)
Author Home Page Link
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Social Media:
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/781133.Henry_L_Sullivan_III
https://www.facebook.com/henrylsullivan3
https://twitter.com/henrysullivan3

SWEPT AWAY by Henry L. Sullivan III

SWEPT_AWAY_COVERFresh off a break up, Sheila McKinley, the easygoing college professor, meets Jasira Said, the up and coming journalist and political columnist.

Sheila has no idea her friend Rima is acquainted with Jasira, so their arranged meeting is easily disguised as a simple dinner party. But this simple dinner party turns into a night full of surprises. Even after she agrees to show Jasira around town, Sheila really doesn’t suspect her real intentions. But after an accident at a night club things move quickly, until in the end everything is crystal clear.

This is the first episode of the serial THE AMERICAN FATHERS.

Targeted Audience: Open minded romantics

Author Bio:
The best description of my writing is Near Future Fiction. I love technology, and I also believe social issues can be addressed in fiction, without compromising the strength of the story or lowering the entertainment level of the work.

In his Listmania! List, Carlos Baez says Near Future Fiction writers “usually extrapolate imaginatively from present trends.” Since we are narrating stories that take place sometime in the next one hundred years, they may include strange, intriguing, and even frightening technologies and phenomena, but our worlds are familiar in a way that makes the events in the stories feel immediate, and therefore avoidable.

Although current social trends may include Monsanto and others lobbying congress for the ability to obtain patents on human genetic sequences, it is still possible for us to avoid the world of The Windup Girl, in which ‘calorie companies’ devastate the global population through plagues caused by genetically enhanced, treatment resistant, disease causing organisms.

In some ways, Dystoopian Narratives are great metaphorical expressions of our fears. Stories like The Hunger Games and Divergent open to worlds that are economically, socially, and politically screwed up. There is also typically the presumption that it’s been that way for a long time.

For the characters, the time before global catastrophe is a distant memory. This creates chronological distance between our world and that of the book’s heroin, making it easier for readers to live vicariously through these engaging characters, as they stand up to fascist societies and battle despotic leaders.

Like Fantasy, Dystopian Science Fiction transports the reader into a completely different world. One which is often far simpler than our own, in which seven percent unemployment characterizes the same economy that also supports a booming stock market, and selfies and twerking have been placed upon media shelves alongside Duck Dynasty and a Whites only Santa Clause.

I acknowledge that our world is confusing, but to me it’s also incredibly interesting. Interesting in a way that can be entertaining, and enlightening. This is evident in well written shows like Homeland and House of Cards.

Characters like Carrie Mathison and Francis Underwood inspire me to write The Hacker, Bryce Anderson, Vanessa Stanton, and crazy Rafi. I hope you enjoy them and learn as much as I have in creating them.

Henry L. Sullivan III

What Inspired You to Write Your Book?
The belief that everyone should be happy.

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